Receptor-specific proteins
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Receptor-specific proteins plant and animal lectins by Edwin Richard Gold

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Published by Excerpta Medica, American Elsevier in Amsterdam, New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Lectins.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographies and indexes.

StatementEdwin R. Gold and Peter Balding.
ContributionsBalding, Peter, joint author.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQP552.L42 G64
The Physical Object
Paginationxiii, 440 p. :
Number of Pages440
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5070330M
ISBN 100444151419
LC Control Number74079239

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, English, Book, Illustrated edition: Receptor-specific proteins: plant and animal lectins / Edwin R. Gold and Peter Balding. Gold, E. R. (Edwin Richard) Get this edition. To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal : G. W. Bazill. Before the ligand binds, the inactive G-protein can bind to a newly revealed site on the receptor specific for its binding. Once the G-protein binds to the receptor, the resulting change in shape activates the G-protein, which releases guanosine diposphate (GDP) and picks up guanosine 3-phosphate (GTP). Receptor phosphorylation by receptor-specific kinases and the binding of various cellular adaptor proteins also regulates receptor desensitization, internalization, sequestration, and recycling. The concepts of affinity and efficacy are used to describe the pharmacology of a drug (ligand).

Receptor-specific proteins produced by genetic engineering are attractive as PET imaging agents, but labeling with conventional 18F-based prosthetic groups is problematic due to long synthesis times, poor radiochemical yields, and low specific activities. Therefore, we developed a modular platform for the rapid preparation of water-soluble prosthetic groups capable of efficiently introducing.   Cell signaling using G-protein-linked receptors occurs as a cyclic series of events. Before the ligand binds, the inactive G-protein can bind to a newly-revealed site on the receptor specific for its binding. Once the G-protein binds to the receptor, the resultant shape change activates the G-protein, which releases GDP and picks up GTP. Targeted protein degradation has generated excitement in chemical biology and drug discovery throughout academia and industry. By hijacking the machinery responsible for protein degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), various cellular targets have been selectively degraded. However, since the tools used, often termed PROteolysis TArgeting Chimeras (PROTACs), hijack the. Cell signaling using G-protein-linked receptors occurs as a cyclic series of events. Before the ligand binds, the inactive G-protein can bind to a newly revealed site on the receptor specific for its binding. Once the G-protein binds to the receptor, the resultant shape change activates the G-protein, which releases GDP and picks up GTP.

Receptor Binding Protein Evolution. Bacteriophage RBPs are thought to evolve mainly by one of two modes: mutation and exchange. Like all proteins, RBP genes can undergo mutations that will alter their activity. In this case, mutations at the specific amino acids that are involved in receptor–RBP contact can alter the binding specificity. Linked directly to an intracellular protein kinase that triggers a cascade of phosphorylation reactions. Insulin receptors. Nuclear hormone receptors. Intracellular and also known as 'nuclear receptors’. Binding of a ligand promotes or inhibits synthesis of new proteins, which may take hours or days to promote a .   Statistical significance was calculated using one-way ANOVA (alpha = ) with multiple comparisons correction. Differences in protein abundance between receptor-specific protein complexes and bystanders noted as (F) OCLN (#) and RDX (∗) or (G) VTI1B (#), and EEA1 (∗). Data from four independent experiments are presented as mean + SEM. Receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME), also called clathrin-mediated endocytosis, is a process by which cells absorb metabolites, hormones, proteins – and in some cases viruses – by the inward budding of the plasma membrane (invagination).This process forms vesicles containing the absorbed substances and is strictly mediated by receptors on the surface of the cell.